Wood and Stone Floor

The selection of a kitchen floor is another example of how our wealth of choices makes those selections all the more difficult.  The criteria for a kitchen floor includes the following:

1.  It must be attractive-a very broad and subjective requirement, which is often in the eye of the beholder.

2.  It must be durable-there are many forms of durability.  For wood, durability may mean looking good with dings and scratches.  With stone or tile, you will want something chip and stain resistant.

3.  The surface should be pleasant to walk on-radiant heat greatly enhances this.  It especially helps  with a stone floor, Wood floors simply need to be smooth and splinter free.  Serious cooks also appreciate a surface that is easy on the feet.

4.  It should fit the budget.  Material prices for kitchen floors can vary from $3.00 per square foot to over $100/sq ft.

5.  One of the most important criteria is that the kitchen compliments the rest of the house.  We can all think of kitchens, which seem as though they were placed in a home without someone ever looking at the style of adjacent rooms.

Stone

Some choices and their general characteristics include:

1.  Wood-varies from soft to quite hard.  A broad palate of colors and textures is available.

2.  Stone-benefits greatly from radiant heat and holds up well to dogs and rough treatment. It can be a bit hard on the feet.

3.  Tile-almost limitless variety available.  Grout choices are important since the grout is usually the hardest part to clean.

4.  Cork-soft to walk on and easy on dropped plates.  Cork has a distinctive look that works in some homes.

5.  Concrete-perfect for radiant heat, and can be finished in many colors and textures-requires special construction detailing.

Walnut floors

The kitchen is one of the most frequently used spaces in the home.  The floors endure spills of everything from spaghetti to red wine, olive oil to flour.  When choosing a kitchen floor just make sure it is ready for all the messy fun you will put it through.

Pine Floors

Stained/Painted Floors

About the Author: James Crisp

James M. Crisp has been an architect for well over 30 years. His architectural firm, Crisp Architects, designs projects throughout New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Massachusetts. In April of 2007, Taunton Press published 'On the Porch' by James M. Crisp and Sandra Mahoney.

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3 Comments

  1. Jim Hysaw August 11, 2011 at 5:18 pm

    Very informative article on types of floors for Kitchens …. I really like the wood/tile combination …. I am considering redoing a home in McKinney Texas and will consider all of the alternatives mentined ….

    Keep it up Jimmy … hope all is well … Jim

  2. Jimmy Crisp August 12, 2011 at 8:16 am

    Thanks Jim,

    Let me know if you need any more info.

  3. Jeanine D. Stoddard August 16, 2011 at 11:37 am

    Hi, Just wanted to let you know how much I enjoyed getting this e-mail. I reviewed all the pictures and just wanted to say I agree with your comment that often times a home owner will remodel a kitchen and it looks so out of place when you look at the rest of the house! I noticed that all of the kitchens are white…someone once told me that when in doubt of what style cabinet to use to match the rest of the house just go with white so it will not compete. These are beautiful. Thank you, Jeanine D. Stoddard

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